Sea desalination

Sea Desalination

Desalination is a separation process used to reduce the dissolved salt content of saline water to a usable level. All desalination processes involve three liquid streams: the saline feedwater (brackish water or seawater), low-salinity product water, and very saline concentrate (brine or reject water).

The saline feedwater is drawn from oceanic or underground sources. It is separated by the desalination process into the two output streams: the low-salinity product water and very saline concentrate streams. The use of desalination overcomes the paradox faced by many coastal communities, that of having access to a practically inexhaustible supply of saline water but having no way to use it. Although some substances dissolved in water, such as calcium carbonate, can be removed by chemical treatment, other common constituents, like sodium chloride, require more technically sophisticated methods, collectively known as desalination. In the past, the difficulty and expense of removing various dissolved salts from water made saline waters an impractical source of potable water. However, starting in the 1950s, desalination began to appear to be economically practical for ordinary use, under certain circumstances.

 

sea desalination system

HOLLOW FIBER ULTRAFILTRATION (UF) MEMBRANE

Pureline Hollow Fiber is a Modified PAN based membrane, which has high fouling resistant characteristics . Pureline has implied a sponge-like structure so that the hollow fiber membrane shows a high tensile strength and long durability. The pore gets bigger from the feed side to the permeate, making the membrane resistance at minimum levels while causing the membrane to have a high velocity of filtering. Membrane thickness, which remains constant in all direction, has a high pressure resistance. The slick membrane surface not only has a high fouling resistance, but also effectively removes microorganisms & suspended solids.

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